U.S. TOWNS AND CITIES WITH DUTCH NAMES

New York City was once called New Amsterdam. The Dutch West India Company settles a large parcel of land in the eastern United States, which in the 1600's became known as New Netherland. The borders of New Netherland would have stretched, in modern times, from southern Delaware through New Jersey and east-central Pennsylvania into eastern and central New York, including Long Island and Manhattan. The Dutch influence on these areas is still felt today, and many towns and cities in the U.S. were named after the towns from which the Dutch settlers had migrated. Parts of New York City are named after original Dutch colonial settlements: Brooklyn, after Breukelen, Harlem after Haarlem. Staten Island, was originally called Staten Eylandt after the Dutch parliament (Staten) who paid for the expeditions up the Hudson River. The place Old Town on Staten Island was originally called Oude Dorp, which in English means Old Town. The following towns in New York have names that were derived from Dutch: Claverack, Cobleskill, Greenbush (East and North), Kinderhook, Plattekill, Nassau, Poestenkill, Rensselaer, Saugerties, Valatie, Voorheesville, Watervliet, and Wynantskill.

Not only New York settled the Dutch; in Michigan are also a lot of towns a cities with Dutch names.

The last Director-General of the colony of New Netherland, Peter Stuyvesant, has given his name to a street, a neighborhood and a few schools in New York City. In Columbia County, near Albany, there is a town named Stuyvesant.

Monument of Peter Stuyvesant, it reads "Pieter Stuyvesant, Director General of New Netherland and Aruba"

This is what I have for now in my collection. If you can help me with police patches from towns and cities I don't have; that would be great.

 

NY NY NY NY NY
OH OH
 Amsterdam  Capital city of Holland aka Nederland

 

NJ
 Barnegat  Dutch for "an inlet with breakers"

 

WI
 Barneveld  Name of a town in Holland

 

IL NY NY NY NY
NY OH
 Batavia  Capital city of our old colony ; today Indonesia

 

NJ NJ NJ (small) NJ NJ
NJ NJ NJ NJ
 Bergen  Name of a town in Holland

 

NJ NJ  NJ  
 Brielle  Name of a town in Holland

 

NY
 Catskill  Originally "Kaatskill"; no sure what it means

 

NY NY
 Cobleskill  Jacob Kobel built a mill on the Cobleskill Creek. The Dutch word for river or creek is kill.

 

NY NY NY NY
 Coeymans  The Dutch owner of the ground

 

NY NY NY NY NY
 Colonie  From the Dutch Colonye or "Colonie," derived from the Colonie of Rensselaerswyck

 

LA
 de Ridder  a Dutch word for "knight"

 

AK
 Dutch Harbor needs explanation?

 

NY NY NY NY NY
NY NY NY NY
 (East) Fishkill  From that of the river which the Dutch settlers in the area called "Vis Kill" which means "Stream full of fish".

 

WI
 Friesland  A Dutch province

 

ID ID MD
 Fruitland  Dutch for "land of fruit"

 

 

 

 

 

NY NY
 (North) (East) Greenbush  Greenbush comes from the Dutch “Greenebos,” a term for pine grove.

 

NY NY NY NY
 Guilderland  From Gelderland, a Dutch province

 

NJ NJ NJ NJ NJ
NJ
 Hackensack  Dutch for "stony ground"

 

GA GA GA GA MT
 Harlem  From Haarlem, name of a town in Holland

 

TX TX TX TX
 Harlingen  Name of a town in Holland

 

CN CN CN CN CN
CN CN CN
CN CN CN
 Hartford  Named after Kievits Hoek, meaning "Plover's Corner" and at present-day Hartford

 

NY NY NY NY
 Haverstraw  Dutch for "Oat straw"

 

MA MA MI MI MI
MI MI MI MI MI
MI MI MI MI MI
MI MI NJ NJ NY
OH OH OH OH PA
PA TX TX TX
 Holland  Our other name for Nederland

MS MS
 Hollandale  Related to Holland

 

NY
 Kortenaer  Name of a Dutch admiral

 

MA MA
 Leyden  From Leiden, name of a town in Holland

 

OH OH(small) OH
 Middleburg  From Middelburg, name of a town in Holland

 

NY NY NY NY NY
NY NY NY NY NY
NY NY NY NY NY
NY NY
 Nassau  An old name for Long Island, which was at one time named  Nassau, after Dutch William of Nassau, Prince of Orange

 

CO CO CO CO CO
MI MI MI TX TX
 Nederland  Our other name for Holland

 

CN CN
 Old Saybrook  Dutch explorers established a short-lived trading post, at present day Old Saybrook.

 

 
CN CT FL IA
NC NC NJ NJ
   
NY NY  NY  NY NY 
NY OH  
SC TX TX TX TX
 Orange  Named after William V, Prince of Orange, Dutch  Stadtholder

 

NY
 Peekskill  The name "Peekskill" derives from a combination of Mr. Peek's surname and the Dutch word for stream, "kil" or "kill".

 

 

IA
 Pella

 The name "Pella" is from a town in Palestina in the 1st century and founded by Dutch.

 

 

NY
 Poestenkill  From the river Poesten Kill, what means "foaming water" or "foaming creek" in Dutch

 

NY
 Red Hook  It is named for the red clay soil and the point of land projecting into the East River. The village was settled by the Dutch colonists of New Amsterdam and named Roode Hoek. In Dutch "Hoek" means "point" or "corner"

 

IN NY NY NY NY
NY NY NY
 Rensselaer  The Dutch owner of the ground

 

   
RI    
 Rhode Island  In 1614 it was christened als Roodt Eylandt ("Rood eiland" in modern Dutch), meaning "Red Island", reffering to the red clay found on the island.

 

NY WI WI
 Rosendale  From Roozendaal, name of a town in Holland

 

NY NY NY NY NY
NY NY NY NY NY
 Rotterdam  Name of a town in Holland

 

CANADA CANADA
 Saint-Eustache  From St. Eustatius, a Dutch island in the Carribean

 

NY NY NY
 Saugerties  Saugerties means "Little Sawyer" in Dutch

 

NY NY NY NY
 Schenectady The Mohawk called the settlement at Fort Orange (present day Albany, NY) "Schau-naugh-ta-da", meaning "over the pine plains." Settlement was led by a prominent Dutchman

 

NY
 Schuylerville  From the Dutch family Schuyler

 

IL IL IL IL IL
IL IL IL
 South Holland  From Zuid-Holland, a Dutch province

 

NJ NJ
 Teaneck  "Tea," means "bordering on a stream," and "Neck," which     signifies "a curved piece of land.'" 

 

WA WA WA WA WA
WA
 Vader  Dutch for "father"

 

AR AR AR AR ME
ME MI MI MI MI
MI
 van Buren  Name of a President with a Dutch history

 

Looking for
 van Zandt  Name of a political leader with a Dutch history

 

NJ NJ NJ

 Voorhees

 "Voor" is a Dutch prefix for "in front of." "Hees" was a village near Ruinen, Drenthe, Holland.

 

MI MI  NY NY NY
 Watervliet  Dutch for "water flood"

 

MI
 Westland  Dutch for "The western part of Holland"

 

OH  PA SC SC
 Williamsburg   Named after William V, Prince of Orange, Dutch  Stadtholder

 

NY NY NY NY
 Yonkers  From "Jonkheer (means young gentleman)  Adriaen van der Donck", the first Dutch owner

 

MI MI MI
 Zeeland  A Dutch province

 

LA LA
Zwolle  Name of a town in Holland

Tinicum Township PA

Tinicum

TINICUM THE FIRST FRONTIER,  Not a new concept. In fact, the entire area along the Delaware river, North of Trenton, New Jersey is considered frontier. Tinicum is certainly one of the first since it's exploration by the Dutch in the late 1500's.
 
The patch & insignia used by the Police Department came about from a design for a bicentennial (1778-1978) button designed by Annie Darrow Combs.
 
THE SPEAR & SHOVEL, Both being pressed into the earth depicts the ending of the hostilities and the beginning of agricultural progress. The broken spear  shows agreement by the Delaware Indians who learned to farm. They gave up attacking the settlers and were referred to by the Iroquois and others as "The Woman".
 
INDIAN MAIDEN, Records exist of close integration of local Indians with early settlers, There was even a marriage of an Indian Princess to an early Dutch explorer.
 
INDIAN CHIEF TEDYUSKUNG, Born in the Trenton area (1705-1763), was considered to be one of the most able Indian Chiefs & was an expert at working out agreements and quelling trouble among the Indians & "Frontiersmen" plying the Delaware River.
 
MINETTMAN, Named after early mineral findings called "Minettes", The Dutch exploration  & exploitation of native ores & coal of the upper Delaware led directly to the eventual industrialization of America, and creating one of the largest industrial valleys-The Delaware Valley.
 
PIONEER WOMAN, Balancing Two Men & Two Women and carrying forward all history within an outline of "Tinicum Township".
 
(This information adapted from an article by a George English, Township resident, in a 1978 issue of the "Tinicum Bulletin".)